Difference between revisions of "AMR-NB-WIP"

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Documented on http://wiki.multimedia.cx/index.php?title=AMR-NB and in 26.101
 
Documented on http://wiki.multimedia.cx/index.php?title=AMR-NB and in 26.101
 +
 
For implementation, see http://svn.mplayerhq.hu/soc/amr/amrnbdec.c?view=markup
 
For implementation, see http://svn.mplayerhq.hu/soc/amr/amrnbdec.c?view=markup
 
  
 
=== Decoding of LP filter parameters ===
 
=== Decoding of LP filter parameters ===

Revision as of 07:51, 8 September 2007

Contents

AMR narrow band decoder

This text aims to be a simpler and more explicit document of the AMR narrow band decoding processes to aid in development of a decoder. Reference to sections of the specification will be made in the following format: (c.f. §5.2.5). Happy reading.

Nomenclature weirdness

Throughout the specification, a number of references are made to the same (or very similar) items with fairly confusing variation. They are listed below to aid understanding of the following text but efforts will be made to consistently use one item name throughout or to use both with the lesser used name in parenthesis.

  • Pitch / Adaptive codebook
  • Fixed / Innovative (also algebraic when referring to the codebook)
  • Quantified means not quantised


Summary

  • Mode dependent bitstream parsing
  • Indices parsed from bitstream
  • Indices decoded to give LSF vectors, fractional pitch lags, innovative code vectors and the pitch and innovative gains
  • LSF vectors converted to LP filter coefficients at each subframe
  • Subframe decoding
    • Excitation vector = adaptive code vector * adaptive (pitch) gain + innovative code vector * innovative gain
    • Excitation vector filtered through an LP synthesis filter to reconstruct speech
    • Speech signal filtered with adaptive postfilter


Bitstream parsing

Documented on http://wiki.multimedia.cx/index.php?title=AMR-NB and in 26.101

For implementation, see http://svn.mplayerhq.hu/soc/amr/amrnbdec.c?view=markup

Decoding of LP filter parameters

The received indices of LSP quantization are used to reconstruct the quantified LSP vectors. (c.f. §5.2.5)

12.2kbps mode summary

  • indices into code books are parsed from the bit stream
  • indices give elements of split matrix quantised (SMQ) residual LSF vectors from the relevant code books
  • prediction from the previous frame is added to obtain the mean-removed LSF vectors
  • the mean is added
  • the LSF vectors are converted to cosine domain LSP vectors


Indices give elements of split matrix quantised (SMQ) residual LSF vectors from the relevant code books

The elements of the SMQ vectors are stored at an index into a code book that varies according to the mode. There are 5 code books for the 12.2kbps mode corresponding to the 5 indices. These tables will be referred to as:

lsf_m_n

the number of indices parsed according to the mode
the index 'position' i.e. 1 for the first index, etc

The 5 indices are stored using 7, 8, 8 + sign bit, 8, 6 bits respectively. The four elements of a 'split quantized sub-matrix' are stored at the index position in the appropriate code book are:

1st index in 1st code book 
r1_1, r1_2, r2_1, r2_2
2nd index in 2nd code book 
r1_3, r1_4, r2_3, r2_4
3rd index in 3rd code book 
r1_5, r1_6, r2_5, r2_6
4th index in 4th code book 
r1_7, r1_8, r2_7, r2_8
5th index in 5th code book 
r1_9, r1_10, r2_9, r2_10

With rj_i :

the first or second residual lsf vector
the coefficient of a residual lsf vector ( i = 1, ..., 10 )
rj_i 
residual line spectral frequencies (LSFs) in Hz


Prediction from the previous frame is added to obtain the mean-removed LSF vectors

zj(n) = rj(n) + 0.65*^r2(n-1)

zj(n) 
a mean-removed LSF vector from the current frame (denoted n)
^r2(n-1) 
the quantified 2nd residual vector of the last frame (denoted n-1)


The mean is added

fj = zj + lsf_mean_m

lsf_mean_m 
a table of the means of the LSF coefficients
the number of indices parsed according to the mode
fj 
the LSF vectors
The LSF vectors are converted to cosine domain LSP vectors

qk_i = cos( fj_i * 2 * π / f_s )

qk_i 
line spectral pairs (LSPs) in the cosine domain
the two lsf vectors give the LSP vectors q2, q4 at the 2nd and 4th subframes; k = 2*j
fj_i 
ith coefficient of the jth LSF vector; [0,4000] Hz
f_s 
sampling frequency in Hz (8kHz)


Other active modes summary

The process for the other modes is similar to that for the 12.2kbps mode.

  • indices into code books are parsed from the bit stream
  • indices give elements of a split matrix quantised (SMQ) residual LSF vector from the relevant code books
  • prediction from the previous frame is added to obtain the mean-removed LSF vector
  • the mean is added
  • the LSF vector is converted to a cosine domain LSP vector


Indices give elements of a split matrix quantised (SMQ) residual LSF vector from the relevant code books

The 3 indices are stored with the following numbers of bits:

Mode (kbps) 1st index (bits) 2nd index (bits) 3rd index (bits)
10.2 8 9 9
7.95 9 9 9
7.40 8 9 9
6.70 8 9 9
5.90 8 9 9
5.15 8 8 7
4.75 8 8 7

The four elements of a 'split quantized sub-matrix' are stored at the index position in the appropriate code book are:

1st index in 1st code book 
r_1, r_2, r_3
2nd index in 2nd code book 
r_4, r_5, r_6
3rd index in 3rd code book 
r_7, r_8, r_9, r_10
r_i 
residual LSF vector (Hz)
the coefficient of vector ( i = 1, ..., 10 )


Prediction from the previous frame is added to obtain the mean-removed LSF vector

z_i(n) = r_i(n) + pred_fac_i * ^r_i(n-1)

z_i(n) 
the mean-removed LSF vector from the current frame (denoted n)
pred_fac_i 
the prediction factor for the ith LSF coefficient
^r_i(n-1) 
the quantified residual vector of the last frame (denoted n-1)

These processes give the LSP vector at the 4th subframe (q4)


The available LSP vector(s) are used to linearly interpolate vectors for the other subframes (c.f. §5.2.6)

12.2 kbps mode

q1(n) = 0.5*q4(n-1) + 0.5*q2(n) q3(n) = 0.5*q2(n) + 0.5*q4(n)

Other modes

q1(n) = 0.75*q4(n-1) + 0.25*q4(n) q2(n) = 0.5 *q4(n-1) + 0.5 *q4(n) q3(n) = 0.25*q4(n-1) + 0.75*q4(n)


The LSP vector is converted to LP filter coefficients (c.f. §5.2.4)

 for i=1..5
   f1_i  = 2*f1(i-2) - 2 * q_2i-1 * f1(i-1)
   for j=i-1..1
     f1_j +=   f1(j-2) - 2 * q_2i-1 * f1(j-1)
   end
 end

f1_-1 = 0; f1_0 = 0;

Same for f2_i with q_2i insteand of q_2i-1

 for i=1..5
   f'1_i = f1_i + f1_i-1
   f'2_i = f2_i - f2_i-1
 end
 for i=1..5
   a_i = 0.5*f'1_i    + 0.5*f'2_i
 end
 for i=6..10
   a_i = 0.5*f'1_11-i - 0.5*f'2_11-i
 end
a_i 
the LP filter coefficients

Decoding of the adaptive (pitch) codebook vector

  • indices parsed from bitstream
  • indices give integer and fractional parts of the pitch lag
  • adaptive codebook vector v(n) is found by interpolating the past excitation u(n) at the pitch lag using an FIR filter. (c.f. §5.6)

12.2kbps mode - 1/6 resolution pitch lag

Indices give integer and fractional parts of the pitch lag
First and third subframes

In the first and third subframes, a fractional pitch delay is used with resolutions: 1/6 in the range [17 3/6, 94 3/6] and integers only in the range [95, 143].

The lower bound of the pitch lag is 17 3/6 and the fractional part is in 1/6 resolution, so the pitch index is given by:

pitch index = integer part*6 + fractional part -(17 3/6)*6

so theoretically...

 if(pitch_index < (94 4/6 - 17 3/6)*6)
   // fractional part is encoded
   
   pitch_lag_int  = pitch_index/6 + 17 3/6;
   pitch_lag_frac = pitch_index - pitch_lag_int*6 + (17 3/6)*6;

but the reference source adds an extra 2/6, i assume for rounding:

   pitch_lag_int = (pitch_index + 5)/6 + 17;
   
 else
   // only integer part encoded, no fractional part
   pitch_lag_int  = pitch_index - 368;
   pitch_lag_frac = 0;

I have not yet discovered the meaning of 368 (368/6 = 61 2/6)

Q: What is the meaning of 368?

Second and fourth subframes

For the second and fourth subframes, a pitch resolution of 1/6 is always used in the range [T1−5 3/6,T1+4 3/6], where T1 is nearest integer to the fractional pitch lag of the previous (1st or 3rd) subframe, bounded by 18...143.

Q: What search is being conducted with the following ranges?

 // find the search range
 search_range_min = max(pitch_lag_int - 5, 18);

Q: Why only subtract 5 rather than 5 3/6? Because of the above mentioned rounding?

 search_range_max = search_range_min + 9;
 if(search_range_max > 143) {
   search_range_max = 143;
   search_range_min = search_range_max - 9;
 }

Q: Why only add/subtract 9 instead of 10? Because of the above mentioned rounding?

 // calculate the pitch lag
 pitch_lag_int  = (pitch_index + 5) + search_range_min - 1;
 pitch_lag_frac = -2;

Q: Why?

The pitch delay is encoded with 9 bits in the first and third subframes and the relative delay of the other subframes is encoded with 6 bits.

Decoding of the algebraic (innovative or fixed) codebook vector

The parsed algebraic codebook index is used to find the positions and amplitudes (signs) of the excitation pulses and to find the algebraic codebook vector c(n).

If the integer part of the pitch lag, T, is less than the subframe size 40, the pitch sharpening procedure is applied which translates into c(n) += βc(n−T) , where β is the decoded pitch gain, ^g_p, bounded by [0.0,1.0] or [0.0,0.8], depending on mode.


Decoding of the adaptive and fixed codebook gains

12.2kbps and 7.95kbps - scalar quantised gains

The received indices are used to find the adaptive codebook gain, ^g_p, and the algebraic codebook gc factor, ^γ_gc (gc for gain correction), from the corresponding quantisation tables.

Other modes - vector quantised gains

The received index gives both the adaptive codebook gain, ^g_p, and the algebraic codebook gc factor, ^γ_gc. The estimated algebraic codebook gain gc′ is found as described in clause 5.7.


Smoothing of the fixed codebook gain

10.2, 6.70, 5.90, 5.15, 4.75 kbit/s modes

Adaptive smoothing of fixed codebook gain. (c.f. §6.1 part 4)


Anti-sparseness processing

7.95, 6.70, 5.90, 5.15, 4.75 kbit/s modes

An adaptive anti-sparseness postprocessing procedure is applied to the fixed codebook vector c(n) in order to reduce perceptual artifacts arising from the sparseness of the algebraic fixed codebook vectors with only a few non-zero samples per subframe. The anti-sparseness processing consists of circular convolution of the fixed codebook vector with an impulse response. Three pre-stored impulse responses are used and a number impNr = 0,1,2 is set to select one of them. A value of 2 corresponds to no modification, a value of 1 corresponds to medium modification, while a value of 0 corresponds to strong modification. The selection of the impulse response is performed adaptively from the adaptive and fixed codebook gains. (c.f. §6.1 5)


Computing the reconstructed speech

Construct excitation:

u(n) = ^g_p.v(n) + ^g_c.c(n)

(c.f. §6.1 part 6)


Additional instability protection

(c.f. §6.1 part 7)


Adaptive post-filtering

(c.f. §6.2.1)


High-pass filtering and upscaling

(c.f. §6.2.2)